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[PHOTO]
ninaperlman:

Jerry Saltz on photography

ninaperlman:

Jerry Saltz on photography

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[VIDEO]

František Drtikol: Exhibited  at the Museum of Decorative Arts

September 5th—November 24th, 2013

“Only the birth of art is of divine substance, whereas the finished work is laden with Earth’s weight.”

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[VIDEO]

Born in 1991, Natalie O’Moore grew up in the suburbs of Pennsylvania before returning to New York, the place where she was born, to attend New York University. She is graduating with a degree in Photography from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies. She has since exhibited her work in group shows in Berlin, Germany at the Berlinische Gallerie and in New York. Recently, she exhibited a series of photographs entitled, Under the Neon Lights, which was shown in the Gallatin Arts Festival. She is currently working on a personal documentary project entitled We, Ourself & I that explores the idea of subjectivity within photography. 

Visit her website at: www.natalieomoore.com 

Follow her tumblr at:  www.natalieomoore.tumblr.com

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[VIDEO]

Came across this guy Jason Lazarus’ work & really love it…in a way that I don’t think I’ve ever gotten into “conceptual photography” before (whatever that means). But his work is both sentimental and critical at the same time - curated very nicely. 

The photos I’ve posted are from three different projects - Heinecken Studies, Michael Jackson Memorial Procession, and Nirvana. All are sort of studies on sentimentality, celebrity culture, personal memory, and mortality. 

Highly recommended

http://jasonlazarus.com/home

- S

[TEXT]
Living Among Angels

'The Ascent' ©Robert Sky Bradshaw

Slipping Halos is Robert Sky Brandon’s personal vision of heaven, where the American photographer explores what might happen to those who are mistakenly welcomed to His kingdom. In the pictures, heaven is a similar place than our homes here on Earth; with the only difference that everything is covered in white. However, through the series the rooms become progressively tarnished. Red objects make their appearance, for sin follows the ones that do not belong in heaven, and it ultimately surrounds them completely, creating their own personal hell “in the midst of everyone else’s heaven.”

For each picture, Brandon creates a miniature set, which he then proceeds to photograph using the technique of Light Painting (also called Light Writing). The rooms he builds are highly unstable, and between fixing the sets and coming up with the correct light exposure, his shoots can take up to 40 hours.  The end results are images that feel both very familiar and surreal at the same time: they are a promise of rest and peace waiting on the other side, yet they remind the viewers that in this world or the next, “hell could be just a door away.”

-Elena Kendall

              

                        ’Abandon Hope All Who…’ ©Robert Sky Bradshaw

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[TEXT]
Collective Snapshots, New Aesthetics, and the Era of Digital Accumulation

© Ventosa, Road to Monument Valley

Lately, I have been hearing a lot about this concept called “the New Aesthetic”, and how it is a “collectively intelligent and sharable phenomena”. If you’re not already familiar with the concept, I recommend you read Bruce Sterling’s great article on the matter, where he explains the idea extensively (warning, it’s a very long essay). To sum it up, the way I understand it  “the New Aesthetics” propose a renovated artistic vision distorted through the lens of our computers.

Pep Ventosa is a Catalan artist whose projects are very much so related with this new idea.  His “Collective Snapshot” Series combine dozens and dozens of snapshots of famous landmarks taken by different people and at different times, which have been uploaded to the web. Ventosa then proceeds to superimpose the images together, transforming the final product into a myriad of abstract subtleties. The images acquire a soft and painterly quality, much like a long exposure photograph of a moving object. However, in his projects the perspective has been inverted: it is our society that moves through time and space, and the monument that remains still -a silent witness of the many generations succeeding each other.  Indeed, to the era of digital accumulation corresponds the proper cumulative consciousness, and it seems nothing but appropriate that the “New Aesthetics” should be involved in it. 

-Elena Kendall

   

© Ventosa, the Eiffel Tower and The London Bus

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[TEXT]
Patti Smith: Camera Solo

Following the release of her celebrated memoir Just Kids in 2010, Patti Smith has rebounded as America’s punk-rock idol. The memoir tells the story of the friendship between the artist herself and the photographer Robert Mapplethorpe from the early seventies until his death in 1989. Smith can once again be found on staff recommended and bestseller shelves in bookstores throughout New York City with her latest published work entitled Camera Solo. Camera Solo is a small art book that contains 70 of Smith’s black and white polaroids released by the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art after Smith’s exhibition in 2011. For the most part, the photographs are simple still-lives, taken in intimate settings far from the manic punk scene; they document Smith’s home, her travels, and her closest acquaintances. There is nothing inherently remarkable about the photographs in Camera Solo, but paired alongside her music, poetry, and memoir, these images expose just another side of Patti Smith that we might not have otherwise known.

-Gabriela June Tully Claymore

Read More About the Book and Exhibition Here:

http://www.pattismithcamerasolo.com/